Posts Tagged ‘cold weather photography’

Yukon Quest “pup-arazzi” at Casavant Kennels

Friday, January 9th, 2015

[by Teresa]  If I was a sleddog, I know where I’d want to live: on an acreage near Tagish, Yukon, where I’d be fed stew and given massages and tucked into a cosy building on those frigid winter nights. It’s also the home of Normand Casavant and Karine Grenier, subjects of a documentary film being shot by Red Letter Films that follows veteran musher, Normand, as he prepares to race in the Yukon Quest.

The production company hired us to do a portrait shoot of Normand’s dogs. The portraits are under wraps until the race, but here are some of the behind-the-scenes shots from our day at Casaventures Kennels. It was overcast so we set up an outdoor studio right in the dogyard, and Karine worked with us all day as we shot portraits of their 30 dogs. Normand and Karine are lovely, and their dogs were fun to work with – it was one of the more delightful shoots we’ve done.

The Yukon Quest is a month away. The legendary 1000-mile dogsled race starts in Whitehorse on February 7. Good luck to Normand and the team – we’ll be at the start line watching!

 

 

 

Gear update: Cold cameras, warm fingers

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

[by Fritz] I’m a big fan of a fingerless glove made by Sportees that I depend on for winter photography – so much so that I blogged about it. Over the past year I’ve been doing lots of wintertime night photography. Cold hands have prompted me to further refine my glove system and I’m tickled with the results.

In deep cold I used to wear polypro liner gloves underneath the Sportees gloves, but polypro seems to transmit the cold, is slippery with lenses, gets smelly and hooks dry skin. Last winter I tried a pair of merino wool finger gloves made by Icebreaker, and they’re amazing. They don’t catch on dry skin, and they’re actually warm and pleasant to wear. I wouldn’t have thought that such a small item of clothing could make such a difference to my work, but photography is impossible without happy hands.

For anyone who spends a lot of time shooting in the cold, I strongly recommend this system: Icebreaker’s merino wool Glove Liners under Sportees’ Michie Dog Musher Gloves with chemical hand warmers tucked into the wrist pockets.

Winter photography: My favourite fingerless gloves

Monday, December 6th, 2010

[by Fritz] Shooting in the cold is hard on your hands. Most gloves are thick and bulky and don’t allow the finger dexterity to adjust small dials on camera equipment. And bare hands quickly become useless when holding cold metal equipment in freezing temperatures.

A couple of years ago Andrea Rodger introduced me to her technical glove that quickly became my favourite for cold weather shooting. I was spending a morning at Andrea’s Sportees Activewear in Whitehorse doing a photo shoot profiling successful Yukon businesses. I’d just finished a week of shooting in minus 30 and I was probably whining about my hands. I was pawing through baskets of gloves when Andrea quickly produced a pair of her Michie Dog Musher Gloves and told me I had to try them.

They’re as good as Andrea said they would be. They’re definitely warmer than regular fingerless gloves, and the design provides lots of flexibility for someone who needs to use their fingers. The glove is made of neoprene and has a little pocket over the wrist where you insert a hand warmer, those chemical heat packs sold by Canadian Tire, MEC and others (in cold weather I sometimes tape heat packs to my camera, to batteries etc). The pocket holds the heat pack right over the inside of your wrist, so it warms the blood as it moves into your hand. I use the Sportees gloves in winter, and I also use them for aerial shooting – when the door is off it can be really cold in the back of an airplane or helicopter.