Posts Tagged ‘Olympics’

Commercial Photo Update

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

[by Fritz] You probably know me for my signature scenics, but we do commercial shoots too. This year we landed some of the top commercial photo assignments in the North. Read on to learn about my recent commercial photography work with organizations like Yukon Economic Development, Outside the Cube, Parks Canada, Canadian Tourism Commission and Government of Nunavut.

Yukon Business Success Stories

To promote the Yukon as a fantastic place to live, work and invest, Yukon Economic Development wanted to showcase fifteen successful Yukon businesses and let their stories carry the campaign. Calgary-based Trigger Communications produced the creative; their direction was for journalistic portraits to accompany interview-based articles, and they wanted cinematic-style dirty edges. Fritz collaborated with Trigger’s art director on location: an airstrip, a lodge, a brewery, a studio and such.

Economic Development in Nunavut

This summer Fritz Mueller Photography partnered with Wildman Productions to complete an ambitious multi-community photo and video shoot for Nunavut Government. Over a three week period, Fritz and Phil and their Inuk assistant logged almost 18,000 km and shot stills and video non-stop in Iqaluit, Pond Inlet, Rankin Inlet, Igloolik and Cambridge Bay. It was a fast-paced shoot that focused on some of the companies, entrepreneurs, artists, resources and communities fuelling Nunavut’s growing economy. Though airports, construction sites, processing plants, ports and other infrastructure formed much of the shoot, environmental portraits of enterprising Nunavut residents was a core part of the shoot.

Canada’s North at Vancouver 2010 Olympics

It’s not every day you get to shoot the Olympics, and it’s also not every day that you get such a multi-layered assignment. We joined our colleagues at Outside the Cube during the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games to help deliver the Canada’s North campaign. This was an intense 18-day shoot that saw Fritz juggle everything from social media coverage to grin-and-grips to long-term legacy needs for the three northern territories. He crisscrossed the Greater Vancouver area photographing Nunavut, NWT and Yukon artists and performers on the world’s stage. We’re proud to have been part of this landmark campaign that has been named one of three finalists for TIAC Marketing Campaign of the Year.

Kluane National Park Photo Collection

Parks Canada is building a new Kluane National Park & Reserve visitor centre in Haines Junction, Yukon, and planning new visitor publications, interpretive installations and multimedia. Over the past year Fritz completed several shoots in different seasons covering a wide range of activities and locations in the park. This was an ambitious, multi-faceted project involving complicated logistics, dozens of enthusiastic talent and typical Kluane conditions like -30° C temperatures, forest fire haze and high winds. Fritz worked closely with Parks Canada staff and an art director, and the shoot was guided by Parks Canada’s national photography guidelines.

The Stuff of an Olympian

Monday, April 12th, 2010

[by Fritz] I remember watching this vibrant Australian blonde win gold in aerial ski jumping during the 2002 Olympics in Salt Lake City. She made it look so easy, and the Aussies went mad when she won. Four years later this same feisty girl took bronze at Turin. In a TV interview she talked about overcoming a string of injuries and broken bones and multiple concussions to do it. I remember wondering what motivated her to compete in such a crazy sport.

A few months ago I got a last-minute call from the Canadian Tourism Commission to shoot one of the 2010 torchbearers in the Yukon. Australian sports superstar and double-medallist Alisa Camplin was coming to run through the streets of Dawson City. I read that Sports Illustrated once listed her as one of the world’s ten sexiest Olympians. Only after reading about the shocking physical challenges she’d faced – she’d broken this and broken that and re-tore ligaments just four months before Turin – did I remember seeing her on TV.

It was a dark morning in Dawson, and Alisa’s torch run was short with disappointing backdrops. That was one shoot I could have really used my new high ISO camera (Canon 1D Mark IV). She was being covered by a pack of media, but in those few minutes she was really gracious and worked hard to give us good shots. She seemed to appreciate the attention in a genuine way.

Later, in the empty bar at the Downtown Hotel, I spent a couple of hours with Alisa and her boyfriend while they played pool and I was uploading files. They were really nice people, and I got to ask Alisa my questions about how she did it.

When she was about four years old she remembers deciding that some day she was going to win the Olympics, only she didn’t know yet which sport. She tried some typical Australian sports, and somehow ended up a skiing aerialist in a country with little snow.  She said she had lots of momentum to win the gold medal, but she had to work much harder and is way more proud of her bronze medal four years later. The physical and mental challenges sounded huge the second time around.

In Dawson she talked about wanting a family, and that her new dream was to be a doctor of sports medicine. But she also seemed doubtful and thought it was probably too late, so instead maybe she’d become a nurse or physical therapist. It was amazing to hear these crazy stories of how hard she pushed herself as an athlete, and you’d think someone with her willpower and courage would have it all figured out. But like lots of us she’s also grappling with unfulfilled dreams and lack of confidence.

I really enjoyed meeting Alisa, and I appreciated her openness about her personal triumphs and challenges. I hope she finds success with her new dreams.